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Haynesworth Has Ailing Knee, Skips Conditioning Test

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Albert Haynesworth experienced swelling in his knee on Saturday morning and he was advised by team doctors to not take the Redskins' conditioning test.

"Albert came in quite early [on Saturday morning] and his knee was irritated," head coach Mike Shanahan said. "The recommendation from the doctors was to have him not run. He hit the bike and got some treatment.

"Hopefully [the swelling] subsides and he can get back in football shape."

For the third day in a row, Haynesworth did not participate in Redskins practice.

He won't participate until he passes the conditioning test.

Midway through Saturday's session, Haynesworth joined defensive linemen on the practice field. For 20 minutes, he watched linemen run through drills and received instruction from defensive coordinator Jim Haslett.

It was the first time in training camp that Haynesworth was on the practice field with teammates.

After practice, Haynesworth was back on the field to work with head athletic trainer Larry Hess on his knee injury.

Shanahan said he did not know when Haynesworth would be able to take the conditioning test.

"It all depends on his knee and how he's feeling," Shanahan said. "I never said he had to take the test every day. I only want him in football shape. When he feels like he can pass the test, we'll let him take it. If he passes it, we'll let him practice with the team."

Added Shanahan: "I think it's in his best interests. He has to be in football shape. There's a setback already -- there's a little bit of swelling in his knee. Hopefully it's not too bad so that he can keep on conditioning and get out with the team in the near future."

Along with on-field instruction from Haslett and defensive line coach Jacob Burney, Haynesworth is also spending time in the classroom learning the Redskins' defense.

"He's getting mental reps," Shanahan said. "He has meetings in the afternoon, meetings in the evening -- probably three hours of meetings going through mental reps and looking at practice.

"He's getting a chance to see what we're doing, both in the classroom and on the practice field. Even though he's not out there in pads, he's getting a lot of work in."

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