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Fred Davis: 'I'd Rather Everybody Make Plays'

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In 2011, the Washington Redskins found themselves nearly barren at receiver, with journeyman Jabbar Gaffney leading the team in receptions and yards.

That season, the team finished dead-last in yards after the catch, illustrating a critical lack of playmakers, as veteran Santana Moss dealt with injury and tight end Fred Davis served a four-game NFL suspension.

Two years later, Davis is a healthy, committed veteran who no longer looks at individual stats. Surrounded by top, young talent, Davis understands that his numbers may diminish while the offense's success soars.

"At the end of the day, I think that as long as we're winning, I don't really mind [numbers]," he said. "I think it's just going to be that type of season, with all of the weapons that we have, I just feel like every game is going to be different. It's going to be a different person that makes plays."

The offense returns four receivers that registered 500 receiving yards last season. Davis, Pierre Garcon and Joshua Morgan are all healthy for the first time together, with Moss, Leonard Hankerson, Aldrick Robinson, Logan Paulsen, Niles Paul and Jordan Reed also in the mix.

If deciding which open receiver to throw to is difficult, Davis envisions how difficult it will be for defenses to prepare.

"One game Alfred [Morris] might have over 100 yards rushing, maybe 200 yards rushing, I don't know. And then one game Pierre [Garçon] might have 100 yards receiving," he said. "It's just all going to be shared.

"I think it's going to be all-around, and I think that's the way championship teams win. When you've got one guy always getting all the balls it doesn't mean they're winning or a good team. So, I'd rather it just be everybody making plays."

There may be only one football to distribute, but Davis is already looking forward to the mismatched matchups he will face with a lethal corps around him.

"It definitely helps," he said with a smile. "When the defense has to worry about that, you might get a lot of zone, sometimes two people on [Garcon].

"A lot of man for me underneath and I feel that is definitely going to help me. I feel one on one I am definitely going to win."

For years, the Redskins have craved a two tight end set that could create mismatches in the defense. Heading into 2013, the team has four tight ends that could wreak havoc on a secondary.

"I think Logan [Paulsen] is definitely a good blocker, a solid blacker, and he can actually catch the ball and run down field with it," Davis reasoned. "You got Niles [Paul] who is really fast, probably a 4.5 [40] guy who can really speed down the middle.

"Then I'm versatile. I could do a little bit of both, so I feel like we have a total package of the all the guys. Then you got [Jordan] Reed now coming in. He's definitely a pass catcher too, so it's just adding more pieces to the puzzle."

Davis gave two thumbs up on his health as he recovers from an Achilles rupture that ended his 2012 season.

With the first preseason contest only eight days away, Davis said he is uncommonly excited to get back out on the field.

"Just catching the ball with full pads and getting that first hit, first catch, first block, full-go. I mean, that's always the anticipation," he said. "I've been out for like nine months, so it definitely feels good to be back."

If all plays out according to plan, Davis thinks this group of tight ends has the opportunity to be the toast of the NFL. The only step left is turning potential into reality.

"I definitely feel that we can be the best corps, but we all have to stay healthy and prove it," he said. "Unless we all stay healthy, we can't really say that because there are other people that have stayed healthy the whole year.

"The Patriots, their tight end group last year – they really set a standard. We definitely have a lot to prove. We have not done that yet so we are not the best yet but I know we have potential to be the best."

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